Teaching Hidden Histories

More about this Program

The core questions of each workshop asked:

  • How do examples of marginalized groups’ experiences in Essex County, Massachusetts illuminate how some histories have been “hidden” within our larger American story?  
  • How can we help students connect with this history, keeping their voices and ideas at the forefront of our teaching?
  • How do we create a safe environment for difficult conversations about complex issues surrounding race, identity, and what it means to be “American,” especially through a local lens that will hit close to home?

Each workshop answered these questions by examining a different topic related to our theme. In advance of the VIRTUAL workshops, teachers received secondary and primary sources and scholars’ recorded presentations to prepare for our time together. At the synchronous workshops, they interacted with scholars and pedagogy experts via a panel discussion, and worked with other teachers in small groups to explore how to integrate content and techniques into curriculum development. Program is designed for secondary humanities teachers, but any educator is welcome to register.

The Workshops

Workshop 1:

Each workshop answered these questions by examining a different topic related to our theme. In advance of the VIRTUAL workshops, teachers received secondary and primary sources and scholars’ recorded presentations to prepare for our time together. At the synchronous workshops, they interacted with scholars and pedagogy experts via a panel discussion, and worked with other teachers in small groups to explore how to integrate content and techniques into curriculum development. Program is designed for secondary humanities teachers, but any educator is welcome to register.


This program was made possible in part by a grant from the National Park Foundation.