Upcoming Workshops 2021

All three workshops for Teaching Hidden Histories will be FREE and VIRTUAL. Registration open for Workshop 2. Click for information about PDP’s and stipends.

Workshop 2

The Struggle for Liberty, Equality, and Property: Examining Resistance to Exclusionary Policies Against Black People in Essex County

Virtual Meeting, Saturday, March 27, 2021
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM.


The history of Black people’s experiences in Essex County, MA, including enslavement, “gradual emancipation,” and hard-fought access to fundamental rights, offers a rich set of stories for our students to explore. In this workshop, we will examine how these experiences exemplify a larger history of structural policies of exclusion and prejudice, but also perseverance and change. In uncovering some of these stories, we will explore how and why this history has often been hidden from view or distorted to fit more comfortable narratives, discussing implications for our students in today’s world.

Join us as we work to answer many questions about this history and its relevance today, including:

  • What are some exemplary stories of Black people’s experiences in our region that highlight larger themes of exclusion and the fight for access?
  • How can primary sources from the region’s past as well as contemporary voices in the local Black community inform our understanding of how to approach this topic with our students?

Speakers:

  • Kabria Baumgartner, Assistant Professor of American Studies, University of New Hampshire; principal investigator, The African Americans in Essex County Project
  • Bethany Jay, Associate Professor of History, Salem State University; co-editor Understanding and Teaching American Slavery

Moderator:

  • Brad Austin, Professor of History at Salem State University

More information to come. Check back again for updates! Read feedback from Workshop 1.


Workshop 3

The Acknowledgement and Recognition of Native Peoples Past and Present

More information to come!

PAST WORKSHOPS

Workshop 1

From Minority to Majority: The Long Journey of 19th Century Irish and Modern Day Latinx Immigrants in the Merrimack Valley

Virtual Meeting, Saturday, January 23, 2021
9:00 AM – 11:00 AM.


Greater Lawrence is and has always been a mixture of different ethnicities and cultures, but few have come to dominate the political and social landscape of the area quite like the Irish and Latinx communities. In this workshop, we will examine how these communities’ journeys exemplify a larger history of structural policies of exclusion, scapegoating and prejudice, but also perseverance and change.

  • What are the similarities and differences between 19th century Irish immigration and 20th century Latinx immigration in our region?
  • How can voices from the immigrant community inform our understanding of how to approach this topic with our students?

Join us as we work to answer many questions about this history and its relevance today, including:

Speakers:

  • Llana Barber, Author of Latino City and professor of American Studies at SUNY Old Westbury
  • Robert Forrant, Professor of History at UMass Lowell
  • Reuben Henriques, History/Social Science Content Support Lead at the Massachusetts Department of Elementary and Secondary Education
  • Glennys Sánchez, Education leader and community activist, Greater Schools Partnership
  • Brian Sheehy, Teacher and History Department Coordinator at North Andover High School

Moderator:

  • Brad Austin, Professor of History at Salem State University
Recording of Workshop 1. January 23, 2021

Feedback from past participants:

“I just cannot say enough about the whole workshop and the rich resources that were shared. I came away feeling so positive about the current students and teachers, both working together to strengthen the local history narrative and to be inclusive of ALL history.”

“I have been looking for something like this for years! I am excited to begin relearning and teaching again, with a new perspective that centers on the needs of my students.”

“The workshop was outstanding. Watching the lectures ahead of time was excellent. The day itself was a great combination of historical scholarship as well as thoughtful discussion about community, perspective and bias.”


This program was made possible in part by a grant from the National Park Foundation.